Quick chicken, tomato and spinach curry

 

Ok, the photo is a shocker but, in my defence, curries are notoriously hard to photograph.  Just to prove my point, there is no photo of this recipe in the cookbook where the recipe was published and … there was no photo on the web page featuring this recipe.  But I was not going to let that deter me.  If you have been following this blog for a while, you would have seen some shockers.  What is one more?

I chose this recipe because I have a lot of silverbeet in the freezer and I wanted to use some of it before the next lot matures.  The recipe calls for fresh baby spinach which is barely wilted.  If I had stuck to the recipe, I am sure my photo would have been more attractive but … I would have one more container of silverbeet in the freezer.  Even though I don’t have any fresh potatoes from the garden and the tomato harvest was not the best this year, I can imagine a time when all the vegetables in this dish did come from my garden.  I would love that. The trick will be to have them all ready to harvest at the same time.  Even without that pleasure, it is certainly a recipe I would make again.

Also, I love that word “quick”.  I find more and more people don’t have the time or the inclination to be preparing dinner from scratch every night.  We want a meal which is quick to make but still tasty and nourishing.  This one ticks all the boxes.  I have simplified it even more than the published version.  This is a recipe for those days where we really don’t feel like cooking.

The recipe calls for skinned chicken thighs.  I bought a whole chicken and cut it into eight pieces.  It will be enough for 3 meals for us which is a double bonus – two cook free days ahead.  You could also buy chicken marylands and cut them into two.  The important thing is, you need skinned chicken on the bone.

The recipe is by Belinda Jeffery from her book Tried and True Recipes.

Ingredients:

  • About ⅓ cup oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tbs* fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1-2 red chillies, seeds and all, finely chopped
  • 2-3 tbs* curry paste (Belinda recommends Madras curry paste)
  • 6-7 chicken thighs, bone-in and skinned – or four chicken marylands cut into two or a whole chicken cut into eight pieces
  • 3 medium size potatoes, cut into small chunks (about 1.5cm)
  • ⅔ cup water
  • 400g can tomatoes, coarsely chopped
  • salt and  black pepper, to taste
  • lemon or lime juice, to taste
  • About 125g baby spinach leaves (or silverbeet (fresh or frozen))

*These are 20 mil tablespoons.

Method:

  1. Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy-based frying pan.
  2. Add the garlic, ginger and chillies and cook them, stirring constantly, for a few minutes.
  3. Add the curry paste and cook it, stirring all the while, for a minute or so until it smells fragrant.
  4. Add the chicken, cook for 2-3 minutes, making sure each piece is coated in the curry mixture.
  5. Add the potatoes, again making sure they’re well coated.
  6. Pour in the water, tomatoes (liquid and all), salt and pepper. Bring it to the boil then reduce the heat, cover the pan and simmer for about 25 minutes, turning the chicken occasionally.
  7. Uncover the pan and cook the curry for a further 10 minutes or so until the chicken is cooked to your liking and the liquid has boiled down and thickened a bit.
  8. Add a squeeze of lemon juice. Taste the sauce, adding more lemon or salt if needed.
  9. Reduce the heat, add the spinach and stir it in until just wilted.

 

Simon Bryant’s Samosas

Who remembers The Cook and the Chef?   I used to love that show.

I started out a real Maggie Beer fan.  I mean I really loved her.  I have eight of her cookbooks which is not a bad effort. I even have autographed copies of her first two books, Maggie’s Orchard and Maggie’s Farm and, thanks to Maus, an autographed copy of Maggie’s Harvest. Continue reading

Thai-style stir-fried green beans and pork

Hello, everyone. This is one of the three bean-themed recipes I made when we had our glut of beans.  I really wanted to post it since I know next year, when we are in bean glut, I will have no idea where to find it.  One of the other recipes is on a similar vein but it has more ingredients. This one is dead simple and tasted just as good.

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Freekeh salad with marinated chicken & pomegranate dressing

Here is another recipe from my current favourite book, Palestine on a Plate, by Joudie Kalla.  I noticed the recipe a while ago and parked it.  Then, the other day, when I was thinking, “What’s for dinner?”, it sprang forth.

It is very simple but it does take about 30 minutes to cook the freekeh so allow yourself sufficient time.

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Did I mention that we have a lot of corn at the moment?  The first day back from our holidays, I picked 14 cobs and, two days later, eight more. We, usually, have a glut this time of the year and go into corn fritter mode.  I have previously posted Bill Grangers’ sweetcorn fritters with roasted tomatoes and bacon and corn & ricotta cakes with roasted tomatoes and pesto from Delicious magazine.  If you are inundated with corn or love corn fritters, I recommend both recipes but, for us, it was time to try something new. Continue reading

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Yoghurt, cucumber and rose petal dip

When I was in Iran, I really wanted to buy a cookbook.  I can think of no better souvenir from a country than a nice thick tome on their fare.  But alas, the only English written cookbook I found was the Australian Women’s Weekly More Slow Cooking.  I am afraid that wasn’t what I had in mind.

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Leeks are a bug bear of mine.  The problem is, they are so easy to grow, I just can’t resist throwing a few seeds into the vegie patch each autumn.  Then, come spring, when they have all grown and are ready for picking on the same day, I have absolutely no idea what to do with them all.

I have tried staggering my planting like all the books advocate but, from my experience, the plants you put in late just catch up to the earlier plants so they still all ripen on the same day. Continue reading

The easiest pumpkin soup recipe ever and … my pressure canner to the rescue

Everyone has their favourite pumpkin soup recipe.  My favourite is one I have posted before – Pumpkin, cashew and coriander soup.  It is a beauty (check it out here) but it does take a bit of effort.  And there are plenty of times when effort does not figure.  For those times, I have been dreaming of a recipe my mum used to make.  I had it hand written in my recipe book but somehow I lost it.  I did ask my sisters but to no avail.   I remembered the ingredients – chicken stock, pumpkin, tomatoes and onion but I couldn’t remember the proportions.

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